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Wednesday 28th Jun 2017

Last week in this space, I explained why I disagree with Major League Baseball which ignores the second half successes of the previous season, essentially making each All-Star Game a first-half only recognition.

In a complementary piece to last week’s National League analysis, I ran the numbers in the standard five offensive fantasy categories for the 2010 American League All-Stars since the 2009 All-Star Game. In bold, I called out several stats that seem out of line for an All-Star.

Next, I looked at several players whose stats indicate they are more deserving based on their results over the last year. Using these criteria, I would replace seven of 24 2010 AL All-Stars (noted as “out” below) with seven others (“in”). That was the same number of NL players I booted (virtually) last week. I also have one honorable mention (“hm”).

We’ll break them down by position, starting with catcher. Joe Mauer and Victor Martinez are no-brainers, but John Buck barely played after the break in 2009 and his counting numbers show it. Other than a fat home run total, his numbers are not extraordinary.

I would install Kurt Suzuki instead. With more runs, home runs (barely), RBI and stolen bases, Oakland’s catcher trumps Buck in all areas other than batting average.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
C
Joe Mauer MIN 572 92 17 82 4 0.325
C
Victor Martinez BOS 504 70 18 87 2 0.302
C out John Buck TOR 331 36 18 58 1 0.275

in Kurt Suzuki OAK 509 63 20 88 5 0.251

First base further underlines the home run infatuation. Paul Konerko has 32 home runs since last year’s game, but his RBI total and batting average are nothing special. Same with Justin Morneau’s power numbers. Granted, Morneau has struggled with injury, but this is about results.

These two would be replaced by a pair of first sackers that put up superior numbers in all of the standard fantasy categories with perhaps the exception of home runs. My additions would be Billy Butler and Kevin Youkilis. Though he is injured, I have to give Kendry Morales an honorable mention. Look at his numbers, registered in just 460 at-bats. Impressive.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
1B
Miguel Cabrera DET 602 108 38 130 7 0.337
1B out Paul Konerko CWS 526 85 32 91 1 0.274
1B out Justin Morneau MIN 470 79 27 86 0 0.291

in Billy Butler KC 616 85 22 101 1 0.318

in Kevin Youkilis BOS 520 110 29 98 6 0.302

hm Kendry Morales LAA 460 76 30 98 2 0.313

At second base, Ty Wigginton’s runs scored and batting average are nothing to write home about. On the other hand, Howie Kendrick spanks the Oriole in every category except… you guessed it… home runs.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
2B
Robinson Cano NYY 622 103 28 97 3 0.336
2B
Dustin Pedroia BOS 574 102 23 73 14 0.289
2B
Ian Kinsler TEX 457 85 15 61 21 0.284
2B out Ty Wigginton BAL 494 58 19 61 0 0.267

in Howie Kendrick LAA 520 72 13 88 13 0.300

I am content with the pairing of Derek Jeter and Elvis Andrus at shortstop.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
SS
Derek Jeter NYY 656 111 16 72 22 0.308
SS
Elvis Andrus TEX 572 94 3 50 40 0.280

I know Adrian Beltre is now a member of the Boston Red Sox, but the reality is that the smell of his time in Seattle has left him too soon. For some reason, the luster is off Michael Young, but he beat Beltre in all five stat categories since the 2009 All-Star Game.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
3B
Evan Longoria TB 609 106 29 108 20 0.289
3B
Alex Rodriguez NYY 557 89 27 120 13 0.287
3B out Adrian Beltre BOS 476 62 16 68 5 0.313

in Michael Young TEX 559 85 23 85 6 0.317

In the outfield/designated hitter group, Jose Bautista’s 35 home runs are gaudy, but his .227 batting average is just unacceptable and his 85 RBI total isn’t special. His Toronto teammate Vernon Wells has even fewer RBI and his .261 average only looks good in comparison with Bautista.

I also flagged a couple of stars that I couldn’t bring myself to vote off the island, Ichiro Suzuki (steals and average) and David Ortiz (home runs and RBI). Each contributes in the aforementioned two categories at least. Trying to put aside how it would look physically, if the two could be melded into one player, he would become a legitimate MVP candidate.

Back on subject, a pair of Twins replace the Jays, with Jason Kubel and in a bit of a surprise, Delmon Young, making my hypothetical team. The Minnesotans offer a major step up in RBI and batting average, though offer a bit less in runs, home runs and stolen bases.





AB R HR RBI SB BA
OF
Torii Hunter LAA 475 69 20 87 12 0.295
OF
Nick Swisher NYY 539 96 30 84 1 0.284
OF
Carl Crawford TB 583 108 18 79 47 0.312
OF
Ichiro Suzuki SEA 647 78 8 46 29 0.332
OF
Josh Hamilton TEX 525 79 26 94 11 0.326
DH
Vladimir Guerrero TEX 530 92 31 104 4 0.311
DH
David Ortiz BOS 499 85 34 109 0 0.261
OF out Jose Bautista TOR 497 85 35 85 4 0.227
OF out Vernon Wells TOR 593 77 25 77 8 0.261

in Jason Kubel MIN 517 66 25 107 1 0.275

in Delmon Young MIN 482 68 19 93 4 0.303

 

Brian Walton is the 2009 National League Tout Wars champion, scoring the most points in the league’s 12-year history. He is a 2009 NFBC league winner and finished in the top 25 nationally in both the NFBC and NFFC last season. His work can also be found daily at TheCardinalNation.com and thecardinalnationblog.com.

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