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Saturday 16th Dec 2017

Every winter, a segment of baseball fans obsess over the percentage that vote deserving players receive from the sportswriters who cast votes for the Hall of Fame. Yet, far fewer pay attention to two other groups of candidates whose only way to Cooperstown is via a committee nomination and far more exclusive voting process.

The latter populations include players who missed the Hall the first time around as well as non-playing personnel, split by the time period during which they were active in the game.

The process received exceptional attention in December 2013 when three of baseball’s winningest managers ever, Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and Bobby Cox, were unanimously voted into the Hall in their first year of eligibility by the 16-member Expansion Era Committee.

Like most others, I applauded the selections. Yet in the 2 ½ years since, I continue to think about key figures who were instrumental to these managers’ long-term success who remain on the outside looking in.

This most recently came to light during Tuesday night’s FOX Sports Midwest St. Louis Cardinals telecast when former Cardinals outfielder and current radio commentator Chris Duncan joined play-by-play man Dan McLaughlin for an inning of discussion.

McLaughlin’s on-air remarks included his view that Chris’ father Dave, long-time Cardinals pitching coach under La Russa, should be enshrined in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

I think that is a worthy topic, as it would be trail-blazing, since no coaches have yet been inducted in Cooperstown. In fact, none have even made the committee ballots, so of course, none could be voted in.

I think Duncan and contemporary Leo Mazzone, the guru behind the Braves’ standout rotations of the 1990s and 2000s, deserve serious consideration. Yankees fans probably feel the same way about Mel Stottlemyre, New York’s pitching coach during Torre’s successful years, but I feel his portfolio is less competitive.

A former MLB All-Star catcher, Duncan served as pitching coach for the Indians and Mariners before joining La Russa in 1983 for a journey that lasted three decades, first with the White Sox, then Athletics and finally Cardinals.

Duncan guided four Cy Young Award winners - LaMarr Hoyt, Bob Welch, Dennis Eckersley and Chris Carpenter - while three of his clubs won World Series. Getting more from less seemed a Duncan trademark. For example, of the four Cy winners, only Eckersley is in the Hall, primarily due to a career-saving shift from starting to closing that was engineered by Duncan and La Russa.

Mazzone’s success was with one organization – the Atlanta Braves – who employed him from 1979 through 2005. Especially during the 1990s, their pitching staff was baseball’s best. In fact, it was arguably the best rotation from top to bottom in baseball history, though they achieved just one World Championship together.

The big three from Atlanta won a total of six Cy Young Awards among them – Greg Maddux with three, Tom Glavine with two and John Smoltz with one. All three, along with their manager Cox, have been enshrined in Cooperstown.

I would like to see the accomplishments of Mazzone and Duncan recognized by those who assemble the committee ballots with the hope they could one day be voted in to join their manager partners in the Hall of Fame.

 Brian Walton was the 2009 National League Tout Wars champion, scoring the most points in the league’s 17-year history. He also holds the all-time NL Tout single-season records for wins and saves. His work can also be found daily at TheCardinalNation.com and thecardinalnationblog.com. Follow Brian on Twitter.

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