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The Usual Rotisserie Suspects PDF Print E-mail
Rotisserie Duck
Written by Don Drooker   
Friday, 21 December 2012 09:50

With the original "Rotisserie League Baseball" book having been published in 1984, some of us are coming up on our 30th year of auction drafts in the Spring of 2013. Almost everything has changed for the fantasy player since those days of the analytic pioneers, but one trait has remained constant. My attendance at over 65 of these soirees indicates that while the people around the table have changed, the personalities haven't.

As with "Dragnet", the names have been changed to protect the innocent, but you should recognize some of these types from your own league.

> "The Hypester" - Not to be confused with a "hipster", this guy automatically buys into all the hype he reads about minor league prospects, rookies, refugees and players from the Pacific Rim. If you told him confidentially to look for a Korean phenom named Sum Yung Guy, he'd probably bid on him. This guy drafted Candy Maldonado in the 80's, Kevin Maas in the 90's and Domonic Brown a few years ago. He also owns a Joe Charboneau baseball card.

> "The Limited" - Not to be confused with a train, this player is literally stuck at the station. He's created some guidelines for the bidding process and doesn't have the courage to go beyond his set values. Invariably, he's the next-to-last bidder on numerous players and ends up leaving money on the table. In poker, this guy is defined as "tight passive" and can be bluffed out of the hand.

> "The Smart Ass" - This smirking fellow has figured out that the game is supposed to be entertainment and his goal is to bring out a player obscure enough to be unknown to half the league -- and the other half doesn't even want to bid. It doesn't matter because he relishes the moment when people are scrambling through their paperwork to locate the bum. We once had an opposing player turn to his partner and say, "Keep bidding until I find the guy." The Smart Ass is willing to have a nobody on his roster in order to bask in the glory of that remark.

> "We Are Family" - This team owner "becomes as one" with the players he drafts. As soon as a player is rostered on his squad, he no longer refers to them by their last name. During the season, he talks about "Von", "Glenn" and "Rick" as if they're all foster children who have been taken into his home. Their injuries impact him on an emotional level and approaching him about a trade is a waste of time.

> "The Pencil Breaker" - This is the well-organized, methodical man who has worked diligently on his plan. The issue at the table is that everyone's strategy is usually blown-up in the first half-hour and the words "flexible" and "spontaneous" aren't in his vocabulary. So, he allocated $18 for any one of three shortstops and after they all go to other teams for over $20, he can be seen breaking pencils in frustration.

> "The Paper Pusher" - In the early days of this pastime before magazines and websites gave us player projections, this player was too lazy to do any real homework and would come to the table with a small piece of paper that had three or four names. His goal was to draft those players, no matter the cost. He could always be seen during the last three hours of the proceedings looking through the Baseball Register trying to find warm bodies to fill those eight $1 spots left on his roster. He never contended, but he would always ruin everyone else's strategy. This is the twin brother of the gambler who hits 17 at the Blackjack table and makes sure the dealer doesn't bust.

> "The Homer" - In a league based in Southern California, you can assume there will be a certain inflation factor for Dodger and Angel players due to the constant barrage of information. This fellow, however, is a fan of a particular team and has never been able to separate himself from that connection. His opponents know that they can always get an extra dollar of his budget spent on that player from the Red Sox or (insert the team of your choice). In addition, his level of interest in that team assures the fact that he's reading about them in March and he becomes a mini-version of the "Hypester."

> "The Enforcer" - Not to be confused with "Dirty Harry" Callahan, this is the person who feels a moral obligation to make sure no other team gets a bargain. If they sense a lull in the bidding for a decent player, they will jump in with a bid at the last moment even if that player isn't a good fit on their team. This type of strategy will almost never succeed, but is guaranteed to always aggravate. The first cousin of the guy who plays every hand at the poker game.

> "The Math Minor" - Managing your money at the table is a necessity. Budgeting certain amounts for positions and/or categories gives you the best chance to win. This guy, however, essentially has no plan and just bids by the seat-of-his pants. An example would be having only one pitching spot left open and getting into a bidding war over a rotation ace when his team has no offense. This is the team that might spend 50% of their budget on pitching and then wonder why they ended up with so many back-up outfielders.

> "The Know-It-All" - This fellow may be a good player, but he is only tolerated by the other members of the league. They're not concerned with his success, only with his attitude. He has no patience for anyone who doesn't know that Joe Mather had 18 appearances at 3B and, therefore, only qualifies as an OF. When opponents are slow to nominate player's names late in the day, he shows his frustration, as if he has somewhere important to go. The truth is, he has nowhere to go because he doesn't have any friends.

> "The Vacillator" - If you've played in the same league for a succession of years, you certainly understand that thinking you can contend every year is a fool's game. If your keeper list is weak a season following a championship, then rebuilding might be part of your thought process. This player knows all that, but gets caught up in the exhilaration of the Draft and starts rostering players that don't fit his strategy. For example, if you're in a NL or AL-only league, maybe he shouldn't be taking players who will be free agents next year. This also applies to rebuilding teams who find themselves in the first division in May and change course (and make trades) because they're fooled by stats that represent only 30% of the season. Usually, by the All-Star break, reality has bitten them in the posterior and they no longer have those young building blocks they acquired at the table.

We'll call our league the "Keyser Soze" Invitational and there you have 11 examples of the kind of opponents you might encounter. If you're the 12th team, there's a name of you too..."The Winner."

Last Updated on Friday, 21 December 2012 11:08
 

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Comments  

 
# ZSnyc 2012-12-21 11:21
Great stuff, Don! The one thing I'll add though is that it's highly likely that every (non-winning as you call it) owner in a league is a combination of two or even more of these types. I'd say I'm a mix of "We are Family" and "The Pencil Breaker." I'll try to follow your advice this year and be neither but I think it's just part of my DNA.

Zach
 

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